User:FrJohn

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Revision as of 20:30, April 20, 2005 by FrJohn (Talk | contribs) (Thoughts on Writing)

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This is a picture of me from a few years ago. My beard is a little fuller now.

I am the founding Sysop of OrthodoxWiki.org. You can contact me by leaving a message on my discussion page, or clicking the E-mail this user link in the "toolbox" on the sidebar. I can also be reached directly by email at info at OrthodoxWiki dot org.

About Me

I am a priest in the Orthodox Church in America and a Ph.D. student at the University of Chicago. My "business card" website is here.

Other sites include:

See also my Wikipedia User page: Wikipedia:User:Jschroe.

Subpages

Quotes

  • Come, O faithful, let us work zealously for the Master,
    For He distributes wealth to His servants.
    Let each of us according to his ability increase his talent of grace:
    Let one be adorned in wisdom through good works; let another celebrate a service in splendor.
    The one distributes his wealth to the poor; the other communicates the word to those untaught.
    Thus we shall increase what has been entrusted to us, and, as faithful stewards of grace,
    We shall be accounted worthy of the Master's joy.
    Make us worthy of this, O Christ our God, in Thy love for mankind.

    - Aposticha from Bridegroom Matins of Great and Holy Tuesday
  • "Orthodoxy is summoned to witness. Now more than ever the Christian West stands before divergent prospects, a living question addressed also to the Orthodox world… The ‘old polemical theology’ has long ago lost its inner connection with any reality. Such theology was an academic discipline, and was always elaborated according to the same western ‘textbooks.’ A historiosophical exegesis of the western religious tragedy must become the new ‘polemical theology.’ But this tragedy must be reendured and relived, precisely as one’s own, and its potential catharsis must be demonstrated in the fullness of the experience of the Church and patristic tradition. In this newly sought Orthodox synthesis, the centuries-old experience of the Catholic West must be studied and diagnosed by Orthodox theology with greater care and sympathy than has been the case up to now… The Orthodox theologian must also offer his own testimony to this world — a testimony arising from the inner memory of the Church — and resolve the question with his historical findings."
    ::- Georges Florovsky, Ways of Russian Theology II, pp. 302-304
  • "Thus, a vision of the whole gradually grew for me that was nourished by the various experiences and realizations I had encountered along my theological path. I rejoiced to be able to say something of my own, something new and yet completely within the faith of the Church. The feeling of aquiring a theological vision that was ever more clearly my own was the most wonderful experience of those years."
    ::- Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, Milestones, p. 150 (quote slightly revised).
  • "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead
  • “If heretics no longer horrify us today, as they once did our forefathers, is it certain that it is because there is more charity in our hearts? Or would it not too often be, perhaps, without our daring to say so, because the bone of contention, that is to say, the very substance of our faith, no longer interests us? Men of too familiar and too passive a faith, perhaps for us dogmas are no longer the Mystery on which we live, the Mystery which is to be accomplished in us. Consequently then, heresy no longer shocks us; at least, it no longer convulses us like something trying to tear the soul of our souls away from us.... And that is why we have no trouble in being kind to heretics, and no repugnance in rubbing shoulders with them.

    “In reality, bias against ‘heretics’ is felt today just as it used to be. Many give way to it as much as their forefathers used to do. Only, they have turned it against political adversaries. Those are the only ones with whom they refuse to mix. Sectarianism has only changed its object and taken other forms, because the vital interest has shifted. Should we dare to say that this shifting is progress?

    “It is not always charity, alas, which has grown greater, or which has become more enlightened: it is often faith, the taste for the things of eternity, which has grown less. Injustice and violence are still reigning; but they are now in the service of degraded passions.