Difference between revisions of "Template:Featured"

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[[Image:Akathist Hymn to the Theotokos icon.jpg|100px|left]]An '''[[akathist]]''' (Greek, ''akathistos'') is a [[hymn]] dedicated to a [[saint]], [[Great Feasts|holy event]], or one of the persons of the [[Holy Trinity]]. The word ''akathist'' itself means "not sitting."  The akathist ''par excellence'' is that written in the 6th century to the [[Theotokos]].  In its use as part of the Salutations to the Theotokos service (used in the Byzantine tradition during [[Great Lent]]), it is often known by its Greek or Arabic names, ''Chairetismoi'' and ''Madayeh'', respectively.
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[[Image:Victor A. Pokrovsky.jpg|100px|left]]'''Victor Alexandrovich Pokrovsky''' was choir director, translator, and music arranger for Metropolitan [[Sergius (Tikhomirov) of Japan]], serving in that position at the [[Holy Resurrection Cathedral (Tokyo, Japan)]] from 1924 until 1962, except for the World War II years and some of the decade following the war.  He followed in the tradition of Russian [[missionary|missionaries]] of bringing the [[Gospel]] to new people in their language. In Japan, he followed in the tradition of Ss. [[Innocent of Moscow]] and [[Nicholas of Japan]] and of Nicholas's successor Sergius. In regard to liturgical music of the Japanese Orthodox Church, Victor Pokrovsky was to Sergius as [[Yakov Tikhai]] was to St. Nicholas. Victor's success was bringing the Russian liturgical music masters to the Japanese in their own language. Metr. Sergius invited Victor, an emigr&eacute; of the Russian civil war, to Tokyo to introduce to the [[Church of Japan|Japanese Church]] the [[Russian Chant|Russian liturgical masterpieces]] of 19th and 20th century, in Japanese. Their association and close collaboration continued until events associated with World War II brought it to an end.
  
The writing of akathists (occasionally spelled ''acathist'') continues today as part of the general composition of an akolouthia, especially in the Slavic tradition, although not all are widely known nor translated beyond the original language.
 
  
'''''Recently featured:''''' [[Apostles]], [[Irene Chrysovalantou]], [[Paschal greeting]], [[Holy Week]], [[Byzantine Notation]].  ''Newly [[:Category:Featured Articles|featured articles]] are presented every '''Friday'''.''
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'''''Recently featured:''''' [[Akathist]], [[Apostles]], [[Irene Chrysovalantou]], [[Paschal greeting]], [[Holy Week]].  ''Newly [[:Category:Featured Articles|featured articles]] are presented every '''Friday'''.''

Revision as of 22:20, May 19, 2006

Victor Alexandrovich Pokrovsky was choir director, translator, and music arranger for Metropolitan Sergius (Tikhomirov) of Japan, serving in that position at the Holy Resurrection Cathedral (Tokyo, Japan) from 1924 until 1962, except for the World War II years and some of the decade following the war. He followed in the tradition of Russian missionaries of bringing the Gospel to new people in their language. In Japan, he followed in the tradition of Ss. Innocent of Moscow and Nicholas of Japan and of Nicholas's successor Sergius. In regard to liturgical music of the Japanese Orthodox Church, Victor Pokrovsky was to Sergius as Yakov Tikhai was to St. Nicholas. Victor's success was bringing the Russian liturgical music masters to the Japanese in their own language. Metr. Sergius invited Victor, an emigré of the Russian civil war, to Tokyo to introduce to the Japanese Church the Russian liturgical masterpieces of 19th and 20th century, in Japanese. Their association and close collaboration continued until events associated with World War II brought it to an end.


Recently featured: Akathist, Apostles, Irene Chrysovalantou, Paschal greeting, Holy Week. Newly featured articles are presented every Friday.