Difference between revisions of "Orthodox Church in America"

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The '''Orthodox Church in America''' (OCA) is an [[autocephaly|autocephalous]] church, led by Metropolitan [[Herman (Swaiko) of Washington]]. It began with the missionary work of the [[Church of Russia|Russian Orthodox Church]] in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. In 1917, the [[Bolshevik Revolution]] brought communication between the churches in North America and Russia to an almost complete halt. In the early 1920s, Patriarch [[Tikhon of Moscow]] directed all Russian Orthodox churches outside of Russia to govern themselves autonomously until regular communication and travel could be resumed. (He died in 1925, and was glorified as a [[saint]] by the [[Church of Russia|Russian Orthodox Church]] in 1989.) At that time, parishes which had been part of a single North American [[diocese]] organized separate dioceses and placed themselves under various other mother churches, giving rise to the current situation of multiple overlapping jurisdictions in North America.  
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The '''Orthodox Church in America''' (OCA) is an [[autocephaly|autocephalous]] church with parishes mainly in the United States and Canada (though it has some parishes in Australia and elsewhere). It began with the missionary work of the [[Church of Russia|Russian Orthodox Church]] in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. In 1917, the [[Bolshevik Revolution]] brought communication between the churches in North America and Russia to an almost complete halt. In the early 1920s, Patriarch [[Tikhon of Moscow]] directed all Russian Orthodox churches outside of Russia to govern themselves autonomously until regular communication and travel could be resumed. (He died in 1925, and was glorified as a [[saint]] by the [[Church of Russia|Russian Orthodox Church]] in 1989.) At that time, parishes which had been part of a single North American [[diocese]] organized separate dioceses and placed themselves under various other mother churches, giving rise to the current situation of multiple overlapping jurisdictions in North America.  
  
 
In the early 1960s, the Orthodox Church in America resumed communication with the Patriarch of Moscow, and in 1970 full communion was restored. At that time, the Patriarch of Moscow officially granted the OCA [[autocephaly]], or self-governing administrative status.  The OCA's autocephaly is not currently recognized by all other autocephalous Orthodox Churches, including the [[Church of Constantinople]].
 
In the early 1960s, the Orthodox Church in America resumed communication with the Patriarch of Moscow, and in 1970 full communion was restored. At that time, the Patriarch of Moscow officially granted the OCA [[autocephaly]], or self-governing administrative status.  The OCA's autocephaly is not currently recognized by all other autocephalous Orthodox Churches, including the [[Church of Constantinople]].
  
The OCA is a member of the [[Standing Conference of the Canonical Orthodox Bishops in the Americas]] (SCOBA).
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The OCA is a member of the [[Standing Conference of the Canonical Orthodox Bishops in the Americas]] (SCOBA).  The current [[primate]] of the OCA is His Beatitude [[Herman (Swaiko) of Washington|Herman]], Archbishop of Washington and Metropolitan of All America and Canada.
  
  

Revision as of 21:47, December 31, 2004

The Orthodox Church in America (OCA) is an autocephalous church with parishes mainly in the United States and Canada (though it has some parishes in Australia and elsewhere). It began with the missionary work of the Russian Orthodox Church in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. In 1917, the Bolshevik Revolution brought communication between the churches in North America and Russia to an almost complete halt. In the early 1920s, Patriarch Tikhon of Moscow directed all Russian Orthodox churches outside of Russia to govern themselves autonomously until regular communication and travel could be resumed. (He died in 1925, and was glorified as a saint by the Russian Orthodox Church in 1989.) At that time, parishes which had been part of a single North American diocese organized separate dioceses and placed themselves under various other mother churches, giving rise to the current situation of multiple overlapping jurisdictions in North America.

In the early 1960s, the Orthodox Church in America resumed communication with the Patriarch of Moscow, and in 1970 full communion was restored. At that time, the Patriarch of Moscow officially granted the OCA autocephaly, or self-governing administrative status. The OCA's autocephaly is not currently recognized by all other autocephalous Orthodox Churches, including the Church of Constantinople.

The OCA is a member of the Standing Conference of the Canonical Orthodox Bishops in the Americas (SCOBA). The current primate of the OCA is His Beatitude Herman, Archbishop of Washington and Metropolitan of All America and Canada.


External links