Timeline of Church History (Byzantine Era (451-843))

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==Byzantine era (451-843)==
 
==Byzantine era (451-843)==
 
*451 [[Fourth Ecumenical Council]] meets at Chalcedon, condemning [[Eutychianism]] and [[Monophysitism]], affirming doctrine of two perfect and indivisible but distinct natures in Christ, and recognizing [[Church of Jerusalem]] as patriarchate;  
 
*451 [[Fourth Ecumenical Council]] meets at Chalcedon, condemning [[Eutychianism]] and [[Monophysitism]], affirming doctrine of two perfect and indivisible but distinct natures in Christ, and recognizing [[Church of Jerusalem]] as patriarchate;  
* 451 The city of Lutetia [Gallo-Roman Paris] is spared from Attila's Huns due to the ministrations of St. [[Genevieve of Paris]]; Attila the Hun defeated at [[w:Battle of Chalons|Battle of Chalons]], last major military operation of the Western Roman Empire, where the Christian allied forces under Roman general Aetius defeated Attila and his Hunnic host, allowing [[Introduction to Orthodox Christianity|Christianity]] and western civilization to continue to flourish;<ref group="note">Allied with the Romans under General Flavius Aetius ("Last of the Romans") were the Christian Visigoths of King Theodoric, the Alans under Sangiban, Salian Franks, Burgundians, Saxons,  Armoricans and Sarmatians. Allied with the Hunnic army of Attila ("The Scourge of God") were the Gepids under their king Ardaric, an Ostrogothic army led by the brothers Valamir and Theodemir (the father of the later Ostrogothic king Theodoric the Great), Vandals, Thuringians, Scythians, and Alamanni; the [[w:Ripuarian Franks|Ripuarian Franks]] fought on both sides as some of them lived outside the Empire. This was the first major battle since the death of [[Constantine I]] where a predominantly Christian force faced a predominantly [[pagan]] opponent. This factor was very much apparent to the contemporaries, who often mention [[prayer]] playing a factor in this battle (e.g., [[w:Gregory of Tours|Gregory of Tours]]' story of the prayers of Aetius' wife saving the Roman's life in ''Historia Francorum'' 2.7).</ref> uprising of Armenian Christians reacting to the pro-[[w:Zoroastrianism|Zoroastrian]] policy of Sassanid Persian king [[w:Yazdegerd II|Yazdegerd II]]; Armenia was guaranteed religious freedom after the [[w:Battle of Avarayr|Battle of Avarayr]].  
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* 451 The city of Lutetia (Gallo-Roman Paris) is spared from Attila's Huns due to the ministrations of St. [[Genevieve of Paris]]; Attila the Hun defeated at [[w:Battle of Chalons|Battle of Chalons]], last major military operation of the Western Roman Empire, where the Christian allied forces under Roman general Aetius defeated Attila and his Hunnic host, allowing [[Introduction to Orthodox Christianity|Christianity]] and western civilization to continue to flourish;<ref group="note">Allied with the Romans under General Flavius Aetius ("Last of the Romans") were the Christian Visigoths of King Theodoric, the Alans under Sangiban, Salian Franks, Burgundians, Saxons,  Armoricans and Sarmatians.<br><br>Allied with the Hunnic army of Attila ("The Scourge of God") were the Gepids under their king Ardaric, an Ostrogothic army led by the brothers Valamir and Theodemir (the father of the later Ostrogothic king Theodoric the Great), Vandals, Thuringians, Scythians, and Alamanni; the [[w:Ripuarian Franks|Ripuarian Franks]] fought on both sides as some of them lived outside the Empire.<br><br>This was the first major battle since the death of [[Constantine I]] where a predominantly Christian force faced a predominantly [[pagan]] opponent. This factor was very much apparent to the contemporaries, who often mention [[prayer]] playing a factor in this battle (e.g., [[w:Gregory of Tours|Gregory of Tours]]' story of the prayers of Aetius' wife saving the Roman's life in ''Historia Francorum'' 2.7).</ref> uprising of Armenian Christians reacting to the pro-[[w:Zoroastrianism|Zoroastrian]] policy of Sassanid Persian king [[w:Yazdegerd II|Yazdegerd II]]; Armenia was guaranteed religious freedom after the [[w:Battle of Avarayr|Battle of Avarayr]].  
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*ca.451-480 Flight of the [[w:Nine Saints|Nine Saints]] of the [[Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church]] from Byzantine Syria, following the [[Fourth Ecumenical Council]]; first translation of the Greek [[Septuagint]] into the [[w:Ge'ez language|Ge'ez language]] (i.e. the Ethiopian Bible), becoming the official Bible of the [[Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church]] as well as of the [[w:Beta Israel|Ethiopian Jewish community]].<ref group="note">Charles Bryant-Abraham (PhD), and The Hon. Knight de Bryan (OAA). ''"[http://www.dskmariam.org/artsandlitreature/litreature/pdf/ethiopianorthodoxchurchofjerusaleml.pdf An Interview with the Venerable Getahun Atlaw, Archdeacon of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, Israel]."'' Courtesy of the Augustan Society.</ref><ref group="note">The Ethiopian Jews ''([[w:Beta Israel|Beta-Israel]], Falashas)'' are the only Jewish community in the world today who accept the [[Septuagint]] (minus Ecclesiasticus). (''[http://www.bibliahebraica.com/the_texts/septuagint.htm Septuagint].'' BiblicaHebraica.org, BiblicaGreece.org.)
 
*452 [[Proterios of Alexandria]] convenes synod in Alexandria to reconcile Chalcedonians and non-Chalcedonians; second finding of the Head of [[John the Forerunner]]; Attila the Hun invades northern Italy, but is convinced to withdraw from Ravenna by Pope [[Leo the Great]]; [[Venice]] founded by fugitives from Attila's army.   
 
*452 [[Proterios of Alexandria]] convenes synod in Alexandria to reconcile Chalcedonians and non-Chalcedonians; second finding of the Head of [[John the Forerunner]]; Attila the Hun invades northern Italy, but is convinced to withdraw from Ravenna by Pope [[Leo the Great]]; [[Venice]] founded by fugitives from Attila's army.   
 
*455 [[w:Vandals|Vandals]] under Gaiseric sack Rome; Germanic Saxons and Angles conquer Britain, founding several independent kingdoms.   
 
*455 [[w:Vandals|Vandals]] under Gaiseric sack Rome; Germanic Saxons and Angles conquer Britain, founding several independent kingdoms.   

Revision as of 18:28, March 11, 2010

Timeline of Church History
Eras Timeline of Church History (Abridged article)
Eras New Testament Era | Apostolic Era (33-100) | Ante-Nicene Era (100-325) | Nicene Era (325-451) | Byzantine Era (451-843) | Late Byzantine Era (843-1054) | Post-Roman Schism (1054-1453) | Post-Imperial Era (1453-1821) | Modern Era (1821-1917) | Communist Era (1917-1991) | Post-Communist Era (1991-Present) |
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Byzantine era (451-843)


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