Skouphos

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A '''skouphos''' (also '''skufiya''', '''skufia''', or '''skoufos''') is an item of [[clerical clothing]] worn by Orthodox Christian [[Monk|monastics]] (in which case it is black [http://www.kosovo.com/monachos.jpg]) or awarded to [[clergy]] as a mark of honor (in which case it is usually red or purple).  It is a soft-sided brimless cap whose top may be pointed (Russian style)<ref>The Russian-style skufia is traditionally pulled down so that it covers the top of the ears. This is practical, to keep out the cold; but it also has a symbolic practice, reminding the monk not to listen to gossip.</ref> [http://www.uocc.ca/store/pics/Vestments/thumb_p2433d.jpg], flat and pleated (Greek style) [http://www.nikitatailor.com/shop/photographs/skufias/red.jpg]), or flat with raised edges (Romanian style) [http://www.nikitatailor.com/shop/photographs/skufias/red2.jpg].  Typically, a monastic receives their skufia either when they first become a [[novice]] or when they are [[tonsure]]d [http://www.newsketemonks.com/images/monks/Ambr6.jpg].  A [[monk]] or [[nun]] who has been tonsured to the [[Great Schema]] will wear a skoufia that has been embroidered with prayers, crosses, and figures of [[seraphim]] [http://www.sestry.ru/church/img/1115_].  
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A '''skouphos''' (also '''skufiya''', '''skufia''', or '''skoufos''') is an item of clerical clothing worn by Orthodox Christian [[Monk|monastics]] (in which case it is black [http://www.kosovo.com/monachos.jpg]) or awarded to [[clergy]] as a mark of honor (in which case it is usually red or purple).  It is a soft-sided brimless cap whose top may be pointed (Russian style)<ref>The Russian-style skufia is traditionally pulled down so that it covers the top of the ears. This is practical, to keep out the cold; but it also has a symbolic practice, reminding the monk not to listen to gossip.</ref> [http://www.uocc.ca/store/pics/Vestments/thumb_p2433d.jpg], flat and pleated (Greek style) [http://www.nikitatailor.com/shop/photographs/skufias/red.jpg]), or flat with raised edges (Romanian style) [http://www.nikitatailor.com/shop/photographs/skufias/red2.jpg].  Typically, a monastic receives their skufia either when they first become a [[novice]] or when they are [[tonsure]]d [http://www.newsketemonks.com/images/monks/Ambr6.jpg].  A [[monk]] or [[nun]] who has been tonsured to the [[Great Schema]] will wear a skoufia that has been embroidered with prayers, crosses, and figures of [[seraphim]] [http://www.sestry.ru/church/img/1115_].  
  
High-ranking [[bishop]]s (such as [[Archbishop]]s and [[Metropolitan archbishop|Metropolitans]]) will sometimes wear a black or purple skufia with a small jewelled [[Christian cross|cross]] on informal occasions [http://ocaphoto.oca.org/filetmp/2003/January/406/Detail/DSC_0006.jpg].  A [[nun]] will sometimes wear a skufia over her monastic [[veil]] [http://edition.cnn.com/2001/WORLD/europe/06/23/pope.ukraine/long.protest.ap.jpp.jpg]; while [[monk]]s often wear the skufia (without a veil) when the [[klobuk]] or epanokamelavkion might get in the way of work.
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High-ranking [[bishop]]s (such as [[Archbishop]]s and [[Metropolitans]]) will sometimes wear a black or purple skufia with a small jewelled [[cross]] on informal occasions [http://ocaphoto.oca.org/filetmp/2003/January/406/Detail/DSC_0006.jpg].  A [[nun]] will sometimes wear a skufia over her monastic [[veil]] [http://edition.cnn.com/2001/WORLD/europe/06/23/pope.ukraine/long.protest.ap.jpp.jpg]; while [[monk]]s often wear the skufia (without a veil) when the [[klobuk]] or epanokamelavkion might get in the way of work.
  
 
==Notes==
 
==Notes==

Revision as of 13:35, June 1, 2008

A skouphos (also skufiya, skufia, or skoufos) is an item of clerical clothing worn by Orthodox Christian monastics (in which case it is black [1]) or awarded to clergy as a mark of honor (in which case it is usually red or purple). It is a soft-sided brimless cap whose top may be pointed (Russian style)[1] [2], flat and pleated (Greek style) [3]), or flat with raised edges (Romanian style) [4]. Typically, a monastic receives their skufia either when they first become a novice or when they are tonsured [5]. A monk or nun who has been tonsured to the Great Schema will wear a skoufia that has been embroidered with prayers, crosses, and figures of seraphim [6].

High-ranking bishops (such as Archbishops and Metropolitans) will sometimes wear a black or purple skufia with a small jewelled cross on informal occasions [7]. A nun will sometimes wear a skufia over her monastic veil [8]; while monks often wear the skufia (without a veil) when the klobuk or epanokamelavkion might get in the way of work.

Notes

  1. The Russian-style skufia is traditionally pulled down so that it covers the top of the ears. This is practical, to keep out the cold; but it also has a symbolic practice, reminding the monk not to listen to gossip.

Source

Wikipedia: Skufia

External links

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