Psalter

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Editions)
(Editions)
Line 117: Line 117:
 
*''A Comparative Psalter'', John Kohlenberger, ed., Oxford, 2006. (ISBN 978-0195297607). This contains the Masoretic Text with translation in the Revised Standard Version, and the Septuagint with translation in the New English Translation of the Septuagint.  
 
*''A Comparative Psalter'', John Kohlenberger, ed., Oxford, 2006. (ISBN 978-0195297607). This contains the Masoretic Text with translation in the Revised Standard Version, and the Septuagint with translation in the New English Translation of the Septuagint.  
 
*''The Psalter According to the Seventy'', Holy Transfiguration Monastery (ISBN 0943405009)
 
*''The Psalter According to the Seventy'', Holy Transfiguration Monastery (ISBN 0943405009)
*[http://www.lulu.com/product/hardcover/the-russian-orthodox-psalter/5997109 ''The Russian Orthodox Psalter''], translated by David Mitchell James, and recently approved for use by the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia
+
*[http://www.lulu.com/product/hardcover/the-russian-orthodox-psalter/5997109 ''The Russian Orthodox Psalter''], translated by David Mitchell James, and approved for use by the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia
  
 
==Sources==
 
==Sources==

Revision as of 08:30, November 17, 2009

The Psalter (also known as the Psalms of David) is the Old Testament book that contains hymns and poems traditionally ascribed to the Holy Prophet and King David, ancestor of our Lord Jesus Christ. Virtually every aspect of worship—praise, thanksgiving, penitence, intercession—is covered in the Psalter.

Contents

The Psalter in Orthodox worship

One modern commentator has described the Psalter as a golden thread running through the beautiful garment that is the divine services of the Orthodox Church. Indeed, the Psalter forms the core of each of the services of the Daily Cycle, the Divine Liturgy, and the other sacramental offices of the Church.

The Psalter is so prevalent in Orthodox worship that St. John Chrysostom said that wherever one looks in the Church, he finds the Psalter "first, last, and central."

Structure of the Psalter

Chapter Divisions—Septuagint vs. Masoretic Text

The Septuagint (LXX) is the version of the Old Testament used by the Orthodox Church. The LXX Psalter differs in several respects from Masoretic Text (MT), which forms the basis for the King James Version and most modern English translations of the Bible.

In addition to substantive, textual differences, the LXX and MT versions of the Psalter differ most obviously in their chapter divisions. This can cause confusion to readers who do not understand the differences between the two versions.

The chapter divisions of the LXX and MT versions of the Psalter correspond as follows:

LXX MT - LXX MT
1-8 1-8 - 115 116:10-19
9 9-10 - 116-145 117-146
10-112 11-113 - 146 147:1-11
113 114-115 - 147 147:12-20
114 116:1-9 - 148-150 148-150


The deuterocanon of the LXX contains an additional Psalm ascribed to David. This 151st Psalm is not numbered with the other 150 and is not included in the Psalter proper.

Kathismata

The Psalter is divided into 20 kathismata. Each kathisma is further divided into three stases. Each stasis contains between one and three chapters. The exception to this is Psalm 118. Due to its great length, this chapter constitutes the entire XVIIth Kathisma.

Each of the divine services contains fixed portions of the Psalter that are read or chanted each time the service is celebrated. In addition, certain services of the Daily Cycle contain prescribed kathisma readings. These prescribed readings rotate daily so that outside of Great Lent the Psalter is read through once in its entirety in a single week.

During the lenten fast, the kathisma readings are accelerated so that the Psalter is read through in its entirety twice each week.

Order of Kathisma Readings

  • Outside of Great Lent
Outside Great Lent the kathismata are appointed to be read according to the following cycle:

Day Orthros Vespers
Su II, III -
M IV, V VI
Tu VII, VIII IX
W X, XI XII
Th XIII, XIV XV
F XIX, XX XVIII
Sa XVI, XVII I


  • During Great Lent
During the weekdays of Great Lent, kathisma readings are added to the services of the Hours so that the entire Psalter is read through twice each week. The cycle of appointed kathismata readings for Great Lent are as follows:

Day Orthros First Hour Third Hour Sixth Hour Ninth Hour Vespers
Su II, III - - - - -
M IV, V, VI - VII VIII IX XVIII
Tu X, XI, XII XIII XIV XV XVI XVIII
W XIX, XX, I II III IV V XVIII
Th VI, VII, VIII IX X XI XII XVIII
F XIII, XIV, XV - XIX XX - XVIII
Sa XVI, XVII - - - - I


See also

External links

Editions

  • A Comparative Psalter, John Kohlenberger, ed., Oxford, 2006. (ISBN 978-0195297607). This contains the Masoretic Text with translation in the Revised Standard Version, and the Septuagint with translation in the New English Translation of the Septuagint.
  • The Psalter According to the Seventy, Holy Transfiguration Monastery (ISBN 0943405009)
  • The Russian Orthodox Psalter, translated by David Mitchell James, and approved for use by the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia

Sources

  • Christ in the Psalms, Archpriest Patrick Henry Reardon (ISBN 1888212217)
  • The Psalter According to the Seventy, Holy Transfiguration Monastery (ISBN 0943405009)
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
interaction
Donate

Please consider supporting OrthodoxWiki. FAQs

Toolbox
In other languages