Presbytera

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'''''Presbytera''''' is a Greek title of honor that is used to refer to a [[presbyter|priest]]'s wife.  It is derived from ''presbyteros''—the Greek word for ''priest'' (literally, "elder").  There does not currently seem to be any standard English equivalent, so most English-speaking Orthodox Christians will use the title most common in the old country churches from which their local family or parish finds its origin.
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'''''Presbytera''''' (Gk. πρεσβυτέρα, pronounced - and sometimes spelt - ''presvytera'') is a Greek title of honor that is used to refer to a [[presbyter|priest]]'s wife.  It is derived from ''presbyteros''—the Greek word for ''priest'' (literally, "elder").  Although 'Presbyteress' has an equivalent meaning, it has a very small usage: most English-speaking Orthodox Christians will use the title most common in the old country churches from which their local family or parish finds its origin.
  
 
==Other languages==
 
==Other languages==
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* Albanian:  ''Prifteresha''
 
* Albanian:  ''Prifteresha''
 
* Arabic:  ''Khouria'' (from the word ''khoury'', meaning "priest")
 
* Arabic:  ''Khouria'' (from the word ''khoury'', meaning "priest")
* Carpatho-Russian:  ''Pani'' (a shortened form of ''Panimatka'')
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* Carpatho-Russian:  ''Pani'' (literally "lady," comparable to ''Pan'' for priests, meaning "lord")
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* Finnish: ''Ruustinna'' (from the word ''rovasti'' (protoiereos), in Karelia: Maatuska)
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* Estonian: ''Presvitera''
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* Old Icelandic: ''Prestkona'' ("priest's woman")
 
* Romanian:  ''Preoteasa''
 
* Romanian:  ''Preoteasa''
* Russian:  ''Matushka'' (literally means "mama," i.e., the intimate form of "mother")
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* Russian:  ''Matushka'' (pronounced ''MAH'-too-shkah'', literally means "mama," i.e., the intimate form of "mother"; more common in "diaspora" Russian traditions than within Russia itself)
* Serbian:  ''Popadija''
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* Serbian:  ''Popadija'' (from the word ''pop'', meaning married priest); ''Protinica'' (pronounced ''proh-tee-NEE'-tsah'') for a [[protopresbyter]]'s wife
* Ukrainian:  ''Panimatka'' or ''Panimatushka'' ("little mama")
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* Ukrainian:  ''Panimatka'' or ''Panimatushka'' (''pani'', "lady" + ''matushka'', "little mama"); ''Dobrodijka'' (pronounced ''doh-BROH-deey-kah'', literally means "a woman who does good"); ''Popadya'' ("priest's wife")
  
==See Also==
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==See also==
 
* [[Diakonissa]]
 
* [[Diakonissa]]
  
 
==Books==
 
==Books==
 
* ''Presbytera:  The Life, Mission, and Service of the Priest's Wife'', by Athanasia Papademetriou (ISBN 0972466142)
 
* ''Presbytera:  The Life, Mission, and Service of the Priest's Wife'', by Athanasia Papademetriou (ISBN 0972466142)
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==External links==
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*[http://www.nsp.goarch.org/ National Sisterhood of Presvyteres] ([[GOARCH]])
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*[http://www.theologic.com/oflweb/inchurch/clergywife.htm "The Orthodox Clergy Wife"] by Matushka Valerie G. Zahirsky (''Orthodox Family Life'')
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*[http://www.roca.org/OA/96/96h.htm "The Shadow of a Priest"] from ''Orthodox America''
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*[http://www.orthodoxinfo.com/praxis/clergy_etiquette.aspx Clergy Etiquette]
  
 
[[Category:Church Life]]
 
[[Category:Church Life]]

Latest revision as of 11:08, July 24, 2012

Presbytera (Gk. πρεσβυτέρα, pronounced - and sometimes spelt - presvytera) is a Greek title of honor that is used to refer to a priest's wife. It is derived from presbyteros—the Greek word for priest (literally, "elder"). Although 'Presbyteress' has an equivalent meaning, it has a very small usage: most English-speaking Orthodox Christians will use the title most common in the old country churches from which their local family or parish finds its origin.

Contents

[edit] Other languages

Presbytera corresponds to the following equivalent titles:

  • Albanian: Prifteresha
  • Arabic: Khouria (from the word khoury, meaning "priest")
  • Carpatho-Russian: Pani (literally "lady," comparable to Pan for priests, meaning "lord")
  • Finnish: Ruustinna (from the word rovasti (protoiereos), in Karelia: Maatuska)
  • Estonian: Presvitera
  • Old Icelandic: Prestkona ("priest's woman")
  • Romanian: Preoteasa
  • Russian: Matushka (pronounced MAH'-too-shkah, literally means "mama," i.e., the intimate form of "mother"; more common in "diaspora" Russian traditions than within Russia itself)
  • Serbian: Popadija (from the word pop, meaning married priest); Protinica (pronounced proh-tee-NEE'-tsah) for a protopresbyter's wife
  • Ukrainian: Panimatka or Panimatushka (pani, "lady" + matushka, "little mama"); Dobrodijka (pronounced doh-BROH-deey-kah, literally means "a woman who does good"); Popadya ("priest's wife")

[edit] See also

[edit] Books

  • Presbytera: The Life, Mission, and Service of the Priest's Wife, by Athanasia Papademetriou (ISBN 0972466142)

[edit] External links

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