Orthodox Metropolis of Korea

From OrthodoxWiki
(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
m
m
 
(27 intermediate revisions by 8 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
The '''Orthodox Metropolis of Korea''', headquartered in Seoul, South Korea, is an [[eparchy]] of the [[Church of Constantinople]].  Its current [[primate]] is His Eminence [[Sotirios (Trambas) of Korea|Sotirios (Trambas)]], [[Metropolitan]] of Korea (both North and South).
+
{{diocese|
{{church|
+
name=Orthodox Metropolis of Korea|
name= Orthodox Metropolis of Korea|
+
jurisdiction=[[Church of Constantinople|Constantinople]]|
founder= Patriarch [[Bartholomew (Archontonis) I of Constantinople]]|
+
type=Metropolis|
independence= N/A|
+
founded=2004|
recognition= N/A|
+
bishop=[[Ambrose (Aristotle Zographos) of Korea|Metr. Ambrose]]|
primate=[[Sotirios (Trambas) of Korea|Metropolitan Sotirios]]|
+
see=Seoul|
 
hq=Seoul, South Korea|
 
hq=Seoul, South Korea|
territory=North and South Korea|
+
territory=South Korea|
possessions= N/A|
+
 
language=Korean|
 
language=Korean|
music=[[Byzantine Chant]]|
+
music=[[Byzantine Chant]], [[Russian Chant]]|
 
calendar=[[Revised Julian Calendar|Revised Julian]]|
 
calendar=[[Revised Julian Calendar|Revised Julian]]|
 
population=''unknown''|
 
population=''unknown''|
 
website=[http://www.orthodox.or.kr Metropolis of Korea]
 
website=[http://www.orthodox.or.kr Metropolis of Korea]
 
}}
 
}}
 +
The '''Orthodox Metropolis of Korea''', headquartered in Seoul, South Korea, is an [[eparchy]] of the [[Church of Constantinople]].  Its current [[primate]] is His Eminence [[Ambrose (Zographos) of Korea|Ambrose (Zographos)]], [[Metropolitan]] of Korea (both North and South).
  
 
<!--== History ==
 
<!--== History ==
The first [[priest]] to serve in Australia was [[Archimandrite]] Dorotheos Bakaliaros around 1896.  In 1898 the first Greek Orthodox parish was established, named after the [[Holy Trinity]].  Communities were originally supplied with priests from the [[Church of Jerusalem]], and later the [[Church of Greece]], and there was no attempt to organise the communities into a [[diocese]].
+
First [[priest]] to serve in Korea was ... around ... .
 +
First [[parish]] was established, named after xxx.  Communities were originally supplied with priests from the [[Church of Russia]], and later the [[Church of Greece]], and there was no attempt to organise the communities into a [[diocese]].
  
In 1924, the Greek Orthodox parishes in Australia were transferred to the [[Church of Constantinople]], who sent [[Christoforos (Knitis) of Samos|Christoforos (Knitis)]] to be the first [[metropolitan]] of Australia and New Zealand. He served until 1929 when he returned to Samos, his homeland.  The next metropolitan was [[Timotheos (Evangelinidis) of Rhodes|Timotheos (Evangelinidis)]], and he arrived in 26 January, 1932, serving until he was elected metropolitan of Rhodes in 1947.  He was replaced by [[Theophylactos (Papathanasopoulos) of Australia and New Zealand|Theophylactos (Papathanasopoulos)]], who served until his death in a car crash on 2 August, 1958. [[Ezekiel (Tsoukalas) of Pisidia|Ezekiel (Tsoukalas)]], then an assistant [[bishop]] in [[Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America|America]], was elected metropolitan of Australia and New Zealand in February 1959, and arrived on 2 April 1959.
+
Transferred to Archdiocese of N&S America.
 +
Transferred to New Zealand.
 +
Own Metropolis. -->
  
On 1 September of that year, the [[Metropolis]] of Australia and New Zealand was elevated to [[Archdiocese]], and Ezekiel to Archbishop.  Later, in 1970, the Holy Synod of the [[Church of Constantinople]] seperated New Zealand from Australia, leaving the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia and the [[Greek Orthodox Metropolis of New Zealand]].  In 1974 Ezekiel was promoted to the Metropolis of Pisidia, and the current Archbishop, [[Stylianos (Harkianakis) of Australia|Stylianos (Harkianakis)]], was elected on 13 February 1974 and enthroned on 26 April, 1975.
+
==History==
 +
In July 1897 the [[Church of Russia|Russian Orthodox Church]] resolved to send missionaries to Korea by decision of the [[Holy Synod]]. [[Archimandrite]] Ambrose Gountko led the three person team, but was refused permission to enter the country.
  
== Recent History ==
+
In 1900, a more hospitable atmosphere between Russia and Korea allowed for a second [[missionary]] team led by Archimandrite Chrysanthos Shehtkofsky to begin an outreach in Seoul. He was joined in Korea by Hierodeacon Nicholas Alexeiev of the original team, and chanter Jonah Leftsenko. On [[February 17]], 1900 in a make-shift [[chapel]] the first known Orthodox [[Divine Liturgy]] was celebrated in the Korean peninsula.
In recent years, there has been great tension between the Archdiocese and the current Ecumenical Patriarch, [[Bartholomew I (Archontonis) of Constantinople|Bartholomew I]] concerning the elevation of one of the [[auxiliary bishop]]s of Australia, [[Joseph (Harkiolakis) of New Zealand|Joseph]], to the metropolitanate of New Zealand.  While some letters were exchanged and published through the Archdiocese-owned Greek newspaper, ''To Vema'', the elevation of Metropolitan Joseph remains in effect and unchanged.  
+
  
==Organization==
+
The first Orthodox church was constructed in Jung Dong, Jung-gu, the central area of Seoul in 1903 and was named in honor of [[Nicholas of Myra|Saint Nicholas]]. However, with the Japanese occupation of Korea from 1910 to 1945 came an intense period of persecution against Orthodox Christian believers. In spite of persecution, in 1912, Fr. Ioannis Kang, the first native Korean Orthodox [[priest]], was [[ordination|ordained]].
The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia is treated as one single archdiocese with five archdiocesan districts: New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory; Victoria and Tasmania; South Australia and the Northern Territory; Queensland and New Guinea; and Western Australia. To assist the archbishop, he has an amount of assistant bishops - currently three, but in previous times as many as five. There are 118 [[parish]]es and communities across Australia, and approximately 300,000 [[faithful]] in the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia.
+
  
The Archdiocese also includes 6 [[monasticism|monasteries]].  The largest male monastery is the Holy [[Monastery of Pantanassa (Mangrove, Australia)|Monastery of Pantanassa]] in New South Wales, and the largest female monastery is the Holy [[Monastery of Gorgoepikoos (Geelong, Australia)|Monastery of Gorgoepikoos]] in Victoria.  In 1982, the archdiocese began the St Andrew's Greek Orthodox Theological College in Sydney, where Archbishop Stylianos currently serves as dean and Bishop Seraphim as sub-dean.  As the lone theological college in Australasia, it often accepts students of other jurisdictions.
+
In November 1921, the Holy Synod of the Patriarchate of Moscow ended its support of the Church of Korea, and the Japanese Orthodox Church gave up its jurisdictional authority. Thus, in 1946, the Orthodox Church of Korea was placed into the position of having to organize itself as a [[parish]].
  
The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia is also a founding member of [[SCCOCA]]. -->
+
The year 1947 saw the ordination of a third Korean priest, Fr. Alexei Kim, just as the last Russian priest departed the country. Father Alexei was the only priest of the Orthodox Church left to serve the people of Korea. Just three years later, on [[July 9]], 1950, he was captured and disappeared without record. As the Korean War descended upon the land the Orthodox Christian community in the region was dispersed and the formal practice of the faith disrupted.
 +
 
 +
However, in 1953, Army Chaplain Archimandrite Andrew Halkiopoulos of the Military Forces of [[Church of Greece|Greece]] became aware of the Korean Orthodox faithful and arranged for the parish in Seoul to be reestablished.
 +
 
 +
The following year the Korean Orthodox Christian Boris Moon was ordained by [[Archbishop]] [[Ireney (Bekish) of New York|Ireneus of Japan]] in Tokyo. Then, on Christmas Eve of 1955, by unanimous decision, the Korean Orthodox community chose formally to come under the jurisdictional authority of the [[Church of Constantinople|Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople]].
 +
 
 +
In 1975, Archimandrite [[Sotirios (Trambas) of Pisidia|Sotirios Trambas]] volunteered to serve in the Korean mission of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. During the ensuing years, he founded a [[monastery]], several parishes both in Korea and in other places in Asia, and a [[seminary]].
 +
 
 +
In 1993, the Holy Synod of Constantinople elected Archimandrite Sotirios Trambas [[Bishop]] of Zelon and Auxiliary Bishop to the [[Metropolitan]] of Australia and New Zealand. In this role, Bp. Sotirios served as Exarch of Korea. On [[April 20]], 2004, the Exarchate of Korea was raised to the rank of a Metropolis, and Bishop Sotirios became the first Metropolitan of Korea.
 +
 
 +
On [[May 28]], 2008, Metropolitan Sotirios retired and was given the title of Metropolitan of Pisidia. On the same day, Bishop [[Ambrose (Zographos) of Korea|Ambrosios of Zelon]] and Auxiliary Bishop of the Metropolis was elected to succeed Metropolitan Sotirios as the Metropolitan of Korea.
 +
 
 +
==Organization==
 +
Today the Orthodox Metropolis of Korea is treated as one single metropolis with ten parishes and eight priests and two deacons in South Korea, which has healthy relations with [[Holy Trinity Church (Pyongyang)|the single North Korean parish]] under the Moscow Patriarchate which was established in 2006. The Metropolis also has a female monastery dedicated to the [[Monastery of the Holy Transfiguration (Gapyeong, Korea)|Holy Transfiguration]]. The Metropolis also has a Theological Seminary dedicated to [[St. Nicholas Orthodox Theological Seminary|St. Nicholas]] which trains the [[clergy]] of Korea and Southeast Asia.
  
 
== The Episcopacy ==
 
== The Episcopacy ==
*Metropolitan [[Sotirios (Trambas) of Korea|Sotirios (Trambas)]] of Korea, 2004-present.
+
*Metropolitan [[Ambrose (Zographos) of Korea|Ambrose (Zographos)]] of Korea
 +
*Metropolitan [[Sotirios (Trambas) of Pisidia|Sotirios (Trambas)]] of Pisidia, who was the first Metropolitan of Korea from 2004 to 2008, is staying in the Monastery of the Holy Transfiguration (Gapyeong.
 +
**Protopresbyter Daniel Na is priest of the church in Incheon, and was involved in the talks with the North Korean parish.
 +
**Hieromonk Theophan (Kim), a Korean priestmonk, is priest for the St. Maxim the Greek chapel (which does services in foreign languages).
  
 
== External links ==
 
== External links ==
 
* [http://www.orthodox.or.kr Official Website of the Metropolis]
 
* [http://www.orthodox.or.kr Official Website of the Metropolis]
 
* [http://www.patriarchate.org/ Official Website of the Orthodox Patriarchate of Constantinople]
 
* [http://www.patriarchate.org/ Official Website of the Orthodox Patriarchate of Constantinople]
 +
* [[w:Korean Orthodox Church|Korean Orthodox Church]]
  
{{stub}}
+
[[Category:Jurisdictions|Korea]]
 +
[[Category:Dioceses|Korea]]
 +
[[Category:Ecumenical Patriarchate Dioceses|Korea]]
  
[[Category:Jurisdictions]]
+
[[el:Μητρόπολη Κορέας]]

Latest revision as of 09:21, September 18, 2012

Orthodox Metropolis of Korea
Jurisdiction Constantinople
Diocese type Metropolis
Founded 2004
Current bishop Metr. Ambrose
See(s) Seoul
Headquarters Seoul, South Korea
Territory South Korea
Liturgical language(s) Korean
Musical tradition Byzantine Chant, Russian Chant
Calendar Revised Julian
Population estimate unknown
Official website Metropolis of Korea

The Orthodox Metropolis of Korea, headquartered in Seoul, South Korea, is an eparchy of the Church of Constantinople. Its current primate is His Eminence Ambrose (Zographos), Metropolitan of Korea (both North and South).


Contents

History

In July 1897 the Russian Orthodox Church resolved to send missionaries to Korea by decision of the Holy Synod. Archimandrite Ambrose Gountko led the three person team, but was refused permission to enter the country.

In 1900, a more hospitable atmosphere between Russia and Korea allowed for a second missionary team led by Archimandrite Chrysanthos Shehtkofsky to begin an outreach in Seoul. He was joined in Korea by Hierodeacon Nicholas Alexeiev of the original team, and chanter Jonah Leftsenko. On February 17, 1900 in a make-shift chapel the first known Orthodox Divine Liturgy was celebrated in the Korean peninsula.

The first Orthodox church was constructed in Jung Dong, Jung-gu, the central area of Seoul in 1903 and was named in honor of Saint Nicholas. However, with the Japanese occupation of Korea from 1910 to 1945 came an intense period of persecution against Orthodox Christian believers. In spite of persecution, in 1912, Fr. Ioannis Kang, the first native Korean Orthodox priest, was ordained.

In November 1921, the Holy Synod of the Patriarchate of Moscow ended its support of the Church of Korea, and the Japanese Orthodox Church gave up its jurisdictional authority. Thus, in 1946, the Orthodox Church of Korea was placed into the position of having to organize itself as a parish.

The year 1947 saw the ordination of a third Korean priest, Fr. Alexei Kim, just as the last Russian priest departed the country. Father Alexei was the only priest of the Orthodox Church left to serve the people of Korea. Just three years later, on July 9, 1950, he was captured and disappeared without record. As the Korean War descended upon the land the Orthodox Christian community in the region was dispersed and the formal practice of the faith disrupted.

However, in 1953, Army Chaplain Archimandrite Andrew Halkiopoulos of the Military Forces of Greece became aware of the Korean Orthodox faithful and arranged for the parish in Seoul to be reestablished.

The following year the Korean Orthodox Christian Boris Moon was ordained by Archbishop Ireneus of Japan in Tokyo. Then, on Christmas Eve of 1955, by unanimous decision, the Korean Orthodox community chose formally to come under the jurisdictional authority of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople.

In 1975, Archimandrite Sotirios Trambas volunteered to serve in the Korean mission of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. During the ensuing years, he founded a monastery, several parishes both in Korea and in other places in Asia, and a seminary.

In 1993, the Holy Synod of Constantinople elected Archimandrite Sotirios Trambas Bishop of Zelon and Auxiliary Bishop to the Metropolitan of Australia and New Zealand. In this role, Bp. Sotirios served as Exarch of Korea. On April 20, 2004, the Exarchate of Korea was raised to the rank of a Metropolis, and Bishop Sotirios became the first Metropolitan of Korea.

On May 28, 2008, Metropolitan Sotirios retired and was given the title of Metropolitan of Pisidia. On the same day, Bishop Ambrosios of Zelon and Auxiliary Bishop of the Metropolis was elected to succeed Metropolitan Sotirios as the Metropolitan of Korea.

Organization

Today the Orthodox Metropolis of Korea is treated as one single metropolis with ten parishes and eight priests and two deacons in South Korea, which has healthy relations with the single North Korean parish under the Moscow Patriarchate which was established in 2006. The Metropolis also has a female monastery dedicated to the Holy Transfiguration. The Metropolis also has a Theological Seminary dedicated to St. Nicholas which trains the clergy of Korea and Southeast Asia.

The Episcopacy

  • Metropolitan Ambrose (Zographos) of Korea
  • Metropolitan Sotirios (Trambas) of Pisidia, who was the first Metropolitan of Korea from 2004 to 2008, is staying in the Monastery of the Holy Transfiguration (Gapyeong.
    • Protopresbyter Daniel Na is priest of the church in Incheon, and was involved in the talks with the North Korean parish.
    • Hieromonk Theophan (Kim), a Korean priestmonk, is priest for the St. Maxim the Greek chapel (which does services in foreign languages).

External links

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
interaction
Donate

Please consider supporting OrthodoxWiki. FAQs

Toolbox
In other languages