Klobuk

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A '''Klobuk''' is an item of clerical clothing worn by Orthodox Christian monks and bishops, especially in the Russian tradition. It is composed of a kamilavka with an epanokamelavkion permanently attached.
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A '''klobuk''' is an item of non-liturgical [[clergy|clerical]] clothing worn by Orthodox Christian [[monk]]s and [[bishop]]s, especially in the Russian tradition. It is composed of a [[kamilavka]] with an epanokamelavkion (veil) permanently attached.
  
Slavic Metropolitans wear a klobuk that is white rather than black. Archbishops and Metropolitans usually wear a small jewelled cross on the front of their klobuk as a mark of their rank.
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Slavic [[metropolitan]]s wear a klobuk that is white rather than black. [[Archbishop]]s and metropolitans usually wear a small jewelled cross on the front of their klobuk as a mark of their rank.
  
The Patriarchs of some Orthodox Churches (for example, the Patriarch of Moscow) wear a white klobuk that is rounded on top, decorated with embroidered images of seraphim, and surmounted with a cross. This is sometimes called a cowl.
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The [[patriarch]]s of some Orthodox Churches (for example, the Patriarch of Moscow) wear a white klobuk that is rounded on top, decorated with embroidered images of [[seraphim]], and surmounted with a cross. This is sometimes called a cowl.
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[[Category:Vestments]]

Revision as of 13:22, August 8, 2005

A klobuk is an item of non-liturgical clerical clothing worn by Orthodox Christian monks and bishops, especially in the Russian tradition. It is composed of a kamilavka with an epanokamelavkion (veil) permanently attached.

Slavic metropolitans wear a klobuk that is white rather than black. Archbishops and metropolitans usually wear a small jewelled cross on the front of their klobuk as a mark of their rank.

The patriarchs of some Orthodox Churches (for example, the Patriarch of Moscow) wear a white klobuk that is rounded on top, decorated with embroidered images of seraphim, and surmounted with a cross. This is sometimes called a cowl.

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