Justinian of Ramsey Island

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The Holy [[Hieromartyr]] '''Justinian of Ramsey Island''', originally from a Breton Celtic family, was the [[confessor]] and spiritual father of Saint [[David of Wales]]. Ramsey Island was the site of Justinian's [[hermitage]], and lies just off the extreme southwest of Wales, near the city of St Davids.  His [[feast day]] is celebrated on [[December 5]].
 
The Holy [[Hieromartyr]] '''Justinian of Ramsey Island''', originally from a Breton Celtic family, was the [[confessor]] and spiritual father of Saint [[David of Wales]]. Ramsey Island was the site of Justinian's [[hermitage]], and lies just off the extreme southwest of Wales, near the city of St Davids.  His [[feast day]] is celebrated on [[December 5]].
  
Saint Justinian was martyred by three of his servants who had been possessed by [[demon]]s.  The servants were driven mad and refused to obey their master, who was entreating them to work and not to lead an idle life. The servants then threw him to the ground and cut off his head. The murderers of the [[saint]] were struck with leprosy, and recognized that this was God's vengeance on them. They lived by a rock still called "lepers' rock", and after loading their bodies with heavy penances were counted worthy of forgiveness through the prayers of St. Justinian.  
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Saint Justinian was [[martyr]]ed by three of his servants who had been possessed by [[demon]]s.  The servants were driven mad and refused to obey their master, who was entreating them to work and not to lead an idle life. The servants then threw him to the ground and cut off his head. The murderers of the [[saint]] were struck with leprosy, and recognized that this was God's vengeance on them. They lived by a rock still called "lepers' rock", and after loading their bodies with heavy penances were counted worthy of forgiveness through the prayers of St. Justinian.  
  
 
St. Justinian's decapitated body rose and took the head in its arms and descended to the sea shore. Walking across the water, it came to the port named after the saint, which is today a lifeboat station, and to the church now dedicated in his name: Llanstinian, near Fishguard.  The saint's [[relics]] are now contained in a shrine behind the high [[altar]] of [[St. David's Cathedral (St. David's, Wales)]], along with those of Saint David.
 
St. Justinian's decapitated body rose and took the head in its arms and descended to the sea shore. Walking across the water, it came to the port named after the saint, which is today a lifeboat station, and to the church now dedicated in his name: Llanstinian, near Fishguard.  The saint's [[relics]] are now contained in a shrine behind the high [[altar]] of [[St. David's Cathedral (St. David's, Wales)]], along with those of Saint David.
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[[Category:Saints]]
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[[Category:Saints of the British Isles]]
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[[Category:Pre-Schism Western Saints]]
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[[Category:Martyrs]]
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[[Category: 6th-century saints]]

Latest revision as of 06:11, October 25, 2012

The Holy Hieromartyr Justinian of Ramsey Island, originally from a Breton Celtic family, was the confessor and spiritual father of Saint David of Wales. Ramsey Island was the site of Justinian's hermitage, and lies just off the extreme southwest of Wales, near the city of St Davids. His feast day is celebrated on December 5.

Saint Justinian was martyred by three of his servants who had been possessed by demons. The servants were driven mad and refused to obey their master, who was entreating them to work and not to lead an idle life. The servants then threw him to the ground and cut off his head. The murderers of the saint were struck with leprosy, and recognized that this was God's vengeance on them. They lived by a rock still called "lepers' rock", and after loading their bodies with heavy penances were counted worthy of forgiveness through the prayers of St. Justinian.

St. Justinian's decapitated body rose and took the head in its arms and descended to the sea shore. Walking across the water, it came to the port named after the saint, which is today a lifeboat station, and to the church now dedicated in his name: Llanstinian, near Fishguard. The saint's relics are now contained in a shrine behind the high altar of St. David's Cathedral (St. David's, Wales), along with those of Saint David.

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