Iconographers

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (alphabetizing)
(added expert template)
Line 1: Line 1:
 +
{{expert}}
 +
 
__NOTOC__
 
__NOTOC__
 
'''Iconographers''' translate revealed scripture and divine truths into visual images, crafting the icon with consecrated brushes, paints, and materials. Ideally, they should be pious individuals trained by holy fathers. Monks and nuns, therefore, have traditionally been the primary source of icons. Most iconographers utside of monasteries today have commercialized the sacred art of iconography.
 
'''Iconographers''' translate revealed scripture and divine truths into visual images, crafting the icon with consecrated brushes, paints, and materials. Ideally, they should be pious individuals trained by holy fathers. Monks and nuns, therefore, have traditionally been the primary source of icons. Most iconographers utside of monasteries today have commercialized the sacred art of iconography.

Revision as of 14:03, February 2, 2007

This article or section needs help from an expert on the subject. Specific recommendations may be found on the talk page. You can help OrthodoxWiki by editing it.


Iconographers translate revealed scripture and divine truths into visual images, crafting the icon with consecrated brushes, paints, and materials. Ideally, they should be pious individuals trained by holy fathers. Monks and nuns, therefore, have traditionally been the primary source of icons. Most iconographers utside of monasteries today have commercialized the sacred art of iconography.

Iconographers should pray, fast, and avoid worldly excitement during their work. Individual interpretation should be kept to a minimum as their task is to pass on tradition by replicating previous icons within prescribed limits. Works should remain anonymous, but if signed, be inscribed with the words, "By the hand of [name]."

Modern Iconographers

Fr. Paul Akmolin

Fr. Paul is an iconographer in the Jordanville school and is the priest of Christ the Savior Orthodox Mission in Wayne, WV. You can view his iconography and commission icons from him through his site Orthodox hand-painted icons

Elias Damianakis

Orthodox Iconography

"Bringing Eastern Mysticism to a western world"

File:Solea View.jpg
Solea view: Egg Tempera Icons & Byzantine Wall Murals

"Damianakis, the world's premier Byzantine artist, has been a pioneer in Byzantine art movement since 1980. This painter, sculptor, and muralist is one of the most prolific and celebrated artists of our time. To date, in addition to his spectacular paintings of a wide variety of Christian Orthodoxy Damianakis has completed more than 500 works and landmark murals throughout the World. He has more than 100 collectors of his work on four continents, and perhaps more than any other artist, he perpetuates the spiritual consciousness of Christianity through his Orthodox Art and Christian model".

Mr. Damianakis has rendered historical icons for the Historic visit of Pope Benedict to Constantinople, His All Holiness Patriarch Bartholomew to the USA as well as numerous others. His work can be seen at his website www.orthodoxiconography.com

With the technique of a gifted servant, Elias hand paints portable icons for private devotion as well as large wall murals to suit the needs of the individual or community. He incorporates various techniques into his work including egg tempera, fresco, secco, gold gilding and produces his own paints from pigments. He renders complete restoration of portable icons and wall murals.

Elias lives his faith and understands his ministry as an Orthodox Iconographer working in the United States. He is currently accepting commissions for iconography for Orthodox communities and laity.

Elias is a man of talent, integrity and devotion.

Orthodox Iconography by the hand Elias Damianakis

Matthew Garrett

St. John of Damascus
Matthew is an iconographer based in Blairsville PA with 15 years experience.

He has worked with Philip Zimmerman of St. John of Damascus Icon Studio since he began as Phil's apprentice in 1991. In 1998 Matthew started his own Studio, and takes both large and small commissions, as well as continuing to collaborate with Mr. Zimmerman.

His work hangs in homes and churches across the United States. Matthew works with acrylic paints, and uses 23K gold leaf. He specializes in unusual subjects, complex compositions, and great detail.

You can view his gallery at www.holy-icons.com


Bridget Julia Hayes

Bridget Julia Hayes is an iconographer living in Tshwane, South Africa.

Matthew Kalamidas

IC ARCHMICH.gif
Matthew Kalamidas developed an interest in art at a young age, attending NYC's Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music and Art & The Performing Arts in New York City, concentrating on fine arts. He later received a Bachelor's Degree in Advertising Art & Design and Visual Communications from SUNY at Farmingdale.

While his schooling concentrated on the fine arts, he never received formal instruction in Byzantine iconography, and is essentially self-taught. Close observation of many historically important Byzantine icons, which he had the opportunity to view while travelling in Greece and throughout the Holy Lands, helped him in learning to use and develop the traditional techniques used to create these unique paintings. The icons are handcrafted with great care using 22kt. German gold leaf and the highest quality acrylic pigments. Icons are created on panels with a raised border and murals are painted on canvas which can then be adhered to the wall surface. Along with samples of traditional iconography in the gallery, you can also view samples of glass and marble etchings.

In his artwork, Matthew employs many different painting techniques, producing completed artworks in various genres ranging from Byzantine icons, to traditional oil paintings. He is currently an accomplished professional graphic artist, working as Art Director at a major publishing house in the United States.

His website is www.byzantinestudio.com.

Vivian Karayiannis

Virgin Mary
Vivian has a true love for her vocation and she is trying to bring spiritual stimulating artwork into the churches. Her diversity as a painter makes it easy to define a specially designed work for any church. She's creating small to wall scale paintings on wood panels or canvas. Vivian's icons are evoking works of fine art and also visual aids that lead those who view and venerate the icons deeper into the spiritual life of the church.

Born in Greece, she moved to North America in 1990 and since 1991 she has lived in Houston, TX, with her husband and two daughters. She studied Byzantine iconography and had her apprenticeship in the atelier of Mr. Hantzaras, one of the leading iconographers in Greece. She continued her studies in art at the University of Houston. During the past 20 years, she painted in many mediums including oils, acrylics, watercolors, but her primary medium is the egg tempera, one of the oldest and most versatile mediums.

Her website is www.heavenlyart.net

Fr. Anthony Salzman

Fr. Anthony is currently pastoring a small community, St. Philothea, in Athens, Georgia, where he is continuing to paint icons for churches and individuals including Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in Augusta, Georgia. He is also teaching Byzantine icon-writing at the University of Georgia through the Continuing Education department. Fr. Salzman has a Masters of Divinity from Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology, and studied Byzantine Iconography and Byzantine Art History for six years in Thessaloniki, Greece.

Fr. Salzman is available for slide lectures and demonstrations on the history, theology, and art of Byzantine iconography. Email him for more information; his email address is on his site.

His website is Image and Likeness Iconography.

Archpriest Andrew Tregubov

A notable Russian-American iconographer and author, and lecturer, Fr. Andrew Tregubov has been writing icons for twenty-five years.

Others

See also

External links

Iconography schools

Icon catalogs


This article or section is a stub (i.e., in need of additional material). You can help OrthodoxWiki by expanding it.
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
interaction
Donate

Please consider supporting OrthodoxWiki. FAQs

Toolbox