Death

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'''Death''' in Eastern [[patristics|patristic]] literature is both the result of [[Adam and Eve|Adam]]'s sin and the principle of sin's perpetuation in succeeding generations. Because of the Greek construction of [[Romans]] 5:12, most of the Greek [[Holy Fathers|fathers of the Church]] held that the verse read, "As by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, because of which all have sinned." This leads to a theology of mortality as the mechanism of [[original sin]] and the fear of death as the motive behind particular acts of sin.
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'''Death''' in Eastern [[patristics|patristic]] literature is both the result of [[Adam and Eve|Adam]]'s sin and the principle of sin's perpetuation in succeeding generations. Because of the Greek construction of [[Romans]] 5:12, most of the Greek [[Holy Fathers|fathers of the Church]] held that the verse read, "As by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, because of which all have sinned." This leads to a theology of mortality as the mechanism of [[Original Sin|original sin]] and the fear of death as the motive behind particular acts of sin.
  
 
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Revision as of 06:53, April 19, 2007

Death in Eastern patristic literature is both the result of Adam's sin and the principle of sin's perpetuation in succeeding generations. Because of the Greek construction of Romans 5:12, most of the Greek fathers of the Church held that the verse read, "As by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, because of which all have sinned." This leads to a theology of mortality as the mechanism of original sin and the fear of death as the motive behind particular acts of sin.


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References

  • Meyendorff, The Rev. John, Byzantine Theology: Historical trends and doctrinal themes. New York: SVS Press. ISBN 0823209679


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