Council of Rimini

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The Council of Rimini (also called the Council of Ariminum) was a local council of the early Christian church held in Ariminum (modern Rimini, Italy). The council was one of a number of councils during the middle of the fourth century that attempted to conciliate the continued disputes with adherents of forms of extreme Arianism following the First Ecumenical Council.

In 358, the Roman Emperor Constantius II requested two councils, one of western bishops at Ariminum and the other of eastern bishops at Seleucia that were to resolve the Arian controversy over the nature of the divinity of Jesus Christ that continued to divide the fourth century church. The Council of Seleucia was originally planned for Nicomedia but was held at Seleucia after an earthquake had struck Nicomedia.[1]

In July 359, the western council of some 300 to 400[2] bishops met. Before the council met, Ursacius of Singidunum and Valens of Mursa proposed a new version of the creed, drafted earlier at a Council of Sirmium in 359, but not presented there. This version held that the Son was like the Father "according to the scriptures." This wording avoided the controversial terms ‘’ousia’‘ (essence), "same substance", and "similar substance."[3] Others favored the Nicene Creed.[4]

Before many of them left the council, the opponents of the Sirmium based creed wrote a letter to emperor Constantius that praised the formula from Nicea and condemned any reconsideration of it. The supporters of Sirmium then proposed the new creed and sent it through Italy.[5]

In the aftermath of the council, Liberius of Rome rejected the new creed, prompting Phaebadius of Agen and Servatus of Tongeren to withdraw their support from the homoian.[1] The supporters of Sirmium formulation deposed Liberius and reappointed Antipope Felix of Rome in his place.[6]

The council was considered a defeat for trinitarianism, and St. Jerome wrote: "The whole world groaned and was astonished to find itself Arian."[7]

Contents

Participants

Those favoring the Creed drafted at Sirmium included:[8]

Those favoring the Creed of Nicea included:

  • Phaebadius of Agen (died c. 392)
  • Servatus of Tongeren (died May 13, 384)
  • Gaudentius of Ariminum (died October 14, 360)
  • Mercurialis of Forl
  • Restitutus of Carthage

References

  1. Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 4, chapter 10.
  2. Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 4, chapter 10.
  3. Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  4. Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  5. Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  6. Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  7. Jerome, Dialogue Against the Luciferians, 19.
  8. Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.

See also

Council of Seleucia

Sources

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