Book of Philemon

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (External link: added cat)
m (Purpose of the epistle: add linh)
Line 2: Line 2:
  
 
==Purpose of the epistle==
 
==Purpose of the epistle==
Paul addressed the epistle specifically to [[Apostle Philemon|Philemon]], his fellow [[apostles|apostle]].  Paul appeals directly to Philemon's Christian conscience in asking him to accept the return of Onesimus, a runaway slave of Philemon's.  Paul indicates that he converted Onesimus to Christianity (1:10-11), therefore making him "profitable" (or "useful").  Paul implores Philemon to treat Onesimus not as a slave but, like Paul, as a brother in Christ.
+
Paul addressed the epistle specifically to [[Apostle Philemon|Philemon]], his fellow [[apostles|apostle]].  Paul appeals directly to Philemon's Christian conscience in asking him to accept the return of [[Apostle Onesimus|Onesimus]], a runaway slave of Philemon's.  Paul indicates that he converted Onesimus to Christianity (1:10-11), therefore making him "profitable" (or "useful").  Paul implores Philemon to treat Onesimus not as a slave but, like Paul, as a brother in Christ.
  
Additionally, Paul offers to take on all debts and transgressions that Onesimus owed to Philemon, just as Christ took on the sins of Man.
+
Additionally, Paul offers to take on all debts and transgressions that Onesimus owed to Philemon, just as Christ took on the sins of Man.
  
 
== External link ==
 
== External link ==

Revision as of 12:59, January 28, 2008

The Epistle to Philemon is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. Philemon is generally regarded as one of the undisputed works of Paul, and it was most likely written in Rome, around 61-63 AD. It is the shortest of Paul's extant letters, consisting of only 25 verses. This epistle, along with epistles to the Ephesians and Colossians, was carried by Tychicus, a disciple and companion of Paul's.

Purpose of the epistle

Paul addressed the epistle specifically to Philemon, his fellow apostle. Paul appeals directly to Philemon's Christian conscience in asking him to accept the return of Onesimus, a runaway slave of Philemon's. Paul indicates that he converted Onesimus to Christianity (1:10-11), therefore making him "profitable" (or "useful"). Paul implores Philemon to treat Onesimus not as a slave but, like Paul, as a brother in Christ.

Additionally, Paul offers to take on all debts and transgressions that Onesimus owed to Philemon, just as Christ took on the sins of Man.

External link

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
interaction
Donate

Please consider supporting OrthodoxWiki. FAQs

Toolbox