Asceticism

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{{spirituality}}
 
'''Asceticism''' is the practice of self-denial (i.e., control of one's [[passions]] and base impulses) for the sake of the Kingdom.  The practice of asceticism - called ascesis - is most often associated exclusively with [[monasticism]], although all the faithful are exhorted to practice lesser forms of ascesis through the Church's regimen of [[prayer]], [[fasting]], and repentance.
 
'''Asceticism''' is the practice of self-denial (i.e., control of one's [[passions]] and base impulses) for the sake of the Kingdom.  The practice of asceticism - called ascesis - is most often associated exclusively with [[monasticism]], although all the faithful are exhorted to practice lesser forms of ascesis through the Church's regimen of [[prayer]], [[fasting]], and repentance.
  
The word "ascetic" comes from the Greek root ἀσκητικός, which is turn is from the verb ἀσκέω, meaning "I train."  The Apostle [[Paul]] likens the Christian life of prayer and repentance to training for various sporting events (1 Cor. 9:24-27; 2 Tim. 4:7).  As such, the methods of ascesis should not be used as ends to themselves, but as means to the end of [[salvation]], the "prize" which the Apostle mentions in First Corinthians.   
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The word "ascetic" comes from the Greek root ἀσκητικός, which is turn is from the verb ἀσκέω, meaning "I train."  The [[Apostle Paul]] likens the Christian life of prayer and repentance to training for various sporting events (1 Cor. 9:24-27; 2 Tim. 4:7).  As such, the methods of ascesis should not be used as ends to themselves, but as means to the end of [[salvation]], the "prize" which the Apostle mentions in First Corinthians.   
  
 
Some forms of ascesis take a much more austere - even seemingly unhealthy - appearance than others, for instance Stylitism, in which the ascetic stands on a high pillar or tree for a prolonged period of time.
 
Some forms of ascesis take a much more austere - even seemingly unhealthy - appearance than others, for instance Stylitism, in which the ascetic stands on a high pillar or tree for a prolonged period of time.
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[[Category:Asceticism]]
 
[[Category:Asceticism]]
 
[[Category:Ethics]]
 
[[Category:Ethics]]
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[[ro:Asceza]]

Latest revision as of 06:19, April 10, 2010

This article forms part of the series
Orthodox Spirituality
Holy Mysteries
Baptism - Chrismation
Eucharist - Confession
Marriage - Ordination
Holy Unction
Three Stages
Catharsis/Purification
Theoria/Illumination
Theosis/Divinization
Hesychasm
Nepsis - Metanoia
Hesychia - Phronema
Mysticism - Nous
Asceticism
Chastity - Obedience
Stability - Fasting
Poverty - Monasticism
Virtues
Humility - Generosity
Chastity - Meekness
Temperance - Contentment
Diligence
Prayer
Worship - Veneration
Prayer Rule - Jesus Prayer
Relics - Sign of the Cross
Church Fathers
Apostolic Fathers
Desert Fathers
Cappadocians
The Philokalia
The Ladder of Divine Ascent
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Asceticism is the practice of self-denial (i.e., control of one's passions and base impulses) for the sake of the Kingdom. The practice of asceticism - called ascesis - is most often associated exclusively with monasticism, although all the faithful are exhorted to practice lesser forms of ascesis through the Church's regimen of prayer, fasting, and repentance.

The word "ascetic" comes from the Greek root ἀσκητικός, which is turn is from the verb ἀσκέω, meaning "I train." The Apostle Paul likens the Christian life of prayer and repentance to training for various sporting events (1 Cor. 9:24-27; 2 Tim. 4:7). As such, the methods of ascesis should not be used as ends to themselves, but as means to the end of salvation, the "prize" which the Apostle mentions in First Corinthians.

Some forms of ascesis take a much more austere - even seemingly unhealthy - appearance than others, for instance Stylitism, in which the ascetic stands on a high pillar or tree for a prolonged period of time.


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